Reclassifying Hospital Floors As “critical” Areas When It Comes To Cleaning

Source: cleaningbusinesstoday.com | Re-Post System4 6/29/2017 – 

For many years, hospitals considered floors “non-critical” areas when it comes to cleaning and disinfecting. This means floors were considered an unlikely source for the spread of infection in a hospital setting.

However, a 2017 study published in the American Journal of Infection Control, has determined that floors do harbor dangerous germs and should be reclassified as “critical” areas requiring more thorough cleaning and disinfecting.

To come to their conclusion, the researchers swabbed floors in rooms with and without patients who have a C. diff infection. In the process, they found that some floors were also contaminated with MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and VRE (Vancomycin-resistant enterococci) both of which have become resistant to most types of antibiotics.

The researchers reported the following:

In rooms with a C. diff patient, floors were more likely to be contaminated with any of the three pathogens. However, C. diff was the most commonly detected of the three pathogens and found on the floors of approximately 50 percent of the rooms.

Forty-one percent of the rooms had one or more objects touching the floors such as medical devices, bed linens, and towels; as these items are touched by patients or healthcare workers, it is possible germs from the floor will be transferred to their hands.

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